‘Big Hero 6′ opens at No. 1; Grosses P70M in 4 days

"Big Hero 6"

Disney’s “Big Hero 6″ directed by Don Hall and Chris Williams. (Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International)

A child prodigy and his lovable robot charmed their way into the hearts of families, fanboys and girls, enabling Disney’s Big Hero 6 to gross a stunning P69.99-million nationwide in just four days (Nov. 6 to 9) and open at No.1.

Arriving with some of the year’s best reviews, Big Hero 6 benefited from strong exit recommendations and the characters’ wide appeal to overlapping audiences.

The animated adventure broke several records on its debut weekend run, the highlights of which are: the Biggest All-Time Non-Franchise Animated Film Opening Weekend (surpassing the P45.9-M of Up); Biggest All-Time Disney Animation Studios’ Opening Weekend (beating the P58.2-M of Monsters University); and Biggest 2014 4-Day Opening Weekend for Animation (ahead of The Lego Movie‘s P23.8-M).

"Big Hero 6"

Hiro Hamada and Baymax in “Big Hero 6.”  (Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International)

Big Hero 6 ‘s opening weekend numbers are also 63 percent higher than its box-office competitor, Interstellar which bowed at P26.23-M for second place.

In the U.S., Big Hero 6 topped the charts with $56.2 million from 3,761 locations, continuing Walt Disney Animation Studios’ recent hot streak with past blockbusters Frozen and Wreck-It Ralph.

Back in the Philippines, the Marvel Comics-based adventure rolled-out in 167 screens. SM North EDSA nabbed the biggest portion of the box-office pie with P3.47-M in 4 days, followed by SM Megamall with P3.10-M and SM Mall of Asia’s P2.81-M.

The fourth to tenth places belonged to Trinoma (P1.87-M), Glorietta 4 (P1.68-M), Eastwood (P1.65-M), SM Cebu (P1.62-M), Ayala Cebu (P1.51-M), Power Plant (P1.39-M) and Greenbelt 3 (P1.30-M).

Rounding out the top 20 cinemas are Shang Cineplex (P1.27-M), Greenhills (P1.23-M), SM Southmall (P1.21-M), Newport (P1.12-M), Gateway (P1.06-M), SM Fairview (P1.01-M), Fisher Mall (P1.00-M), Festival Mall (P 988,438), Robinsons Magnolia (P 987,597) and Market! Market! (P 979,292).

"Big Hero 6"

“Big Hero 6″ (Photo courtesy of Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International)

With all the heart and humor audiences expect from Walt Disney Animation Studios, Big Hero 6 is an action-packed comedy-adventure about robotics prodigy Hiro Hamada, who learns to harness his genius—thanks to his brilliant brother Tadashi and their like-minded friends: adrenaline junkie Go Go Tomago, neatnik Wasabi, chemistry whiz Honey Lemon and fanboy Fred. When a devastating turn of events catapults them into the midst of a dangerous plot unfolding in the streets of San Fransokyo, Hiro turns to his closest companion—a robot named Baymax—and transforms the group into a band of high-tech heroes determined to solve the mystery.

Directed by Don Hall (Winnie the Pooh) and Chris Williams (Bolt), and produced by Roy Conli (Tangled), Big Hero 6 features the voices of an extraordinary ensemble cast, including Maya Rudolph as Aunt Cass, James Cromwell as Professor Robert Callaghan, Damon Wayans Jr. as Wasabi, T.J. Miller as Fred, Alan Tudyk as Alistair Krei, Jamie Chung as Go Go Tomago, Genesis Rodriguez as Honey Lemon and Daniel Henney as Tadashi, with Ryan Potter as Hiro Hamada and Scott Adsit as Baymax.

Inspired by the Marvel comics of the same name, and featuring adrenaline-pumping action, heartfelt emotion and plenty of humor, Big Hero 6 is now playing in Philippine theaters in 3D.

#TBT: Kisapmata (1981)

BY Gina Tumlos

"Kisapmata" (1981) directed by Mike de Leon.

“Kisapmata” (1981) directed by Mike de Leon.

True to his form, Mike De Leon once again holds up a mirror to the Filipino psyche and domestic fragmentation in all its pernicious permutations.  He skillfully skirts through the backdoors of Philippine society to uncover the underground world of the suffocating and seemingly unbreakable familial ties in Kisapmtata (1981) starring Vic Silayan, Charito Solis, and Charo Santos. The film is every bit as chilling and unsettling as a Stanley Kubrick film, a strong parallelism which can be drawn from both directors’ complete control of the mise- en- scene.

"Kisapmata" (1981)

“Kisapmata” (1981)

Based on a true event that occurred in the early 60s, the movie follows a young woman’s (Charo Santos) struggle to break free from her father’s (Vic Silayan) smothering grasp by marrying her co-worker Mike (Mike Ilagan). What follows is a disturbing picture of a father’s deranged attempt to keep the couple away from each other and ultimately, to keep Mila for himself. The mother, played by Charito Solis, becomes a ghost whenever the father comes into the picture. Her performance is frightened but not hysterical, a fitting prototype of a woman beaten into cyclic violence and submission. High praise, however, should also be given to Vic Silayan’s performance of the abusive, pot-bellied patriarch to whom the film owes its overarching feel of claustrophobia. Reminiscent of Jose Rizal’s Padre Damaso and the frail Maria Clara, the father- daughter tandem between him and Mila as shown in the beginning represents how the concept of the Filipino family has transformed over the years. The patriarchal model of the household was losing its appeal, and in its place was a creature of the changing times: an inverted power structure where the young learned early on how inebriating straying from convention was.

"Kisapmata" (1981)

“Kisapmata” (1981)

Made in 1981 while still under the Marcos Regime, Kisapmata captures a time when the notion of the traditional family was beginning to shatter.  Women specifically were gaining a more active voice in society and in politics. Martial Law produced a fertile environment for women to come together as the immense degradation of the Filipina spurred the birth of campaigns against the trafficking of Filipino women and the exploitation of women in general, as well as awareness-raising efforts on instances of torture and rape of female political detainees. The stark difference between Mila and her mother reflects this budding yet ubiquitous movement towards activism. Mila eventually recognizes the danger of living with her father and finally decides to elope with her husband. In the only dialogue between the two in the film, the mother laments over her daughter’s abandonment of her and how she herself tried to run away but to no avail. Mila, on the other hand, manages to make it out the front door but returns to sever the ties that bind once and for all. For those who have seen the film, we know that the following scenes do not play out how we want it to, but instead leads to the culmination of this beautifully orchestrated psychological nightmare.

"Kisapmata" (1981)

“Kisapmata” (1981)

De Leon’s prowess as an avant- garde filmmaker is not dimmed by the film’s linear narrative. His attention to detail adds layers of foreboding as the frame shifts from a home filled with paintings and books to that of Mila’s grotto- like cage. In addition to this, sound plays an indomitable role the film. Vic Silayan’s cackle is disorienting and nerve-wracking, it is as if we half expect him to take out his belt and whip the nearest object. The power of his voice never wavers no matter who he’s talking to be it his comrades or his daughter. Ambient noises are likewise intensified, especially creaks and bangs, to further accentuate confinement and restraint. Notable as well are the number of shots focusing on the lower extremities of the characters, thus adding to the perverse tension among Mila, her father, and Mike. Hints of what is to come are distributed throughout both implicitly (zooming in on the statue of Jesus Christ at the latter part of the movie) and explicitly (Mila’s nightmare about rushing water while trapped inside the house).

"Kisapmata" (1981)

“Kisapmata” (1981)

Much of the film’s potency comes from the eventual implication of everyone in the film’s finale. With everyone guilty of blame, we can’t fully sympathize with either one or the other; at the same time, we can’t just self-righteously condemn just one person. The father’s possessiveness, the mother’s passivity, Mila’s fear and eventually her compliance, and Mike’s lack of foresight all add to the parcel of realism, familiarity, and depravity Kisapmata delivers on a silver platter.

‘Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends’ Is a Finishing Touch to a Masterpiece

BY Gina Tumlos

rurouni-kenshin-the-legend-ends-slide-32

Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends is the final installation for the Kyoto arc, and boy, what an ending it is. Those familiar with the anime will be pleased to see the appearance of a beloved character and hints of character back stories (which could *hopefully* mean a prequel) and those who were hooked just recently on Rurouni Kenshin and Rurouni Kenshin: Kyoto Inferno  will be floored by the intense and deftly choreographed fight scenes this film is littered with.

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Takeru Satoh returns in ‘Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends’

Takeru Satoh as Kenshin Himura in "Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends" (Photo courtesy of Warner Bros.)

Takeru Satoh as Kenshin Himura in “Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends” (Photo courtesy of Warner Bros.)

He took Manila by storm last August during a historic Asian premiere (and press conference, too!). He wowed audiences and critics alike with a calm but fiery performance in Kyoto Inferno (read our review here!). Now, Takeru Satoh returns to Philippine cinemas as the legendary Kenshin Himura in the final chapter of the epic Rurouni Kenshin trilogy – Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends.

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New comedy ‘And So It Goes’ exclusive at Ayala Malls cinemas

"And So It Goes" (Photo courtesy of Clarius Entertainment)

“And So It Goes” (Photo courtesy of Clarius Entertainment)

From acclaimed director Rob Reiner (The Bucket List, When Harry Met Sally) comes the uplifting comedy And So It Goes starring Michael Douglas and Diane Keaton. The film will be shown exclusively at Ayala Malls Cinemas nationwide starting Sept. 24.

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‘Pudsey The Dog: The Movie’ is not for everyone

By Joanna Mendoza

Too cute for all that (Photo courtesy of Vertigo Films)

BGT’s Pudsey is too cute for his self-titled movie. (Photo courtesy of Vertigo Films)

The fact that I hadn’t heard much about Pudsey the Dog: The Movie by the time I had the chance to see it made me apprehensive about spending about 90 minutes of my life (and my husband’s… and our two sons’) watching it.

Still it was a chance for a family date, so I decided for all of us to go anyway. And before leaving for the screening, I did a little bit of research about the movie.

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Why ‘The Walking Dead’ is better than ‘Game of Thrones’

By Joanna Mendoza

Grossed out or not, I can't get enough of "The Walking Dead."

Grossed out or not, I can’t get enough of “The Walking Dead.”

A few days ago, I read a very interesting article on EW.com. It’s a TV Fight Club pitting The Walking Dead against Game of Thrones. I’ve always felt that Game of Thrones fans–at least those who are so hardcore that there’s just no room left in their pop-culture-loving hearts for another popular genre show–in some ways look down on Walking Dead fans and on the show itself.

I think that’s mighty unfair, but to each his own.

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Throwback Thursday: Robin Williams made me a very happy kid

By Joanna Mendoza

Time for a sobfest. Jack, starring Robin Williams, is one of my all-time favorite movies. (Photo courtesy of Buena Vista Pictures)

Time for a sobfest. Jack, starring Robin Williams, is one of my all-time favorite movies. (Photo courtesy of Buena Vista Pictures)

My childhood wouldn’t have been complete without Robin Williams. One of my top 5 favorite movies starred him as a 10-year-old trapped in a 40-year-old man’s body. And then, of course, there’s the Peter Pan and Genie of it all.

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‘Girl Meets World’ makes me cry on a weekly basis

By Joanna Mendoza

Rowan Blanchard and Ben Savage in a scene from the opening credits of "Girl Meets World."

Charmers new and old. Rowan Blanchard and Ben Savage in a scene from the opening credits of “Girl Meets World.”

Months before Girl Meets World was supposed to start, I decided to binge-watch Boy Meets World. I never finished it and I felt that Corrie et al were too special to simply be read about on Wikipedia.

I remember Cory (Ben Savage) and Shawn (Rider Strong) from when they were little, from the earlier episodes. I know the show went on until the characters had gone to college, but I don’t remember having seen any of those college eps. I don’t even remember them graduating high school. I think my siblings and I stopped watching Boy when the Disney Channel here stopped airing new episodes.

Come Boy marathon day, my husband picked a random ep from the latter seasons. In the episode, Eric was looking for a new place to stay because his roommate’s girlfriend was being a bitch. Actually, I don’t really know the nitty gritty of what was happening there; I just knew even then that you don’t kick Will Friedle out of your dorm room unless you’re insane.

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